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Shop > Artists' Books

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#05986

Here's Your Irony Back

Artist
Raymond Pettibon
Date
2013
Publisher
Hatje Cantz
Format
Artists' Books
Details
Hardcover
Size
28 × 33 × 2.6 cm
Length
212 
Description

From his earliest years as an artist working in the ferment of Southern California’s vibrant punk scene, Raymond Pettibon has freighted his drawings with references to the uglier episodes in America’s history, and in particular to the darker corners of the counterculture. Pettibon explored the social and sexual practices that defined the 1960s, from the drug-induced utopianism of the hippie communes to American imperialism in Vietnam, from the radical political activism of the Weathermen to the cult of the Kennedy clan and the crimes of the Manson “Family.” In the 1980s, Pettibon focused on Ronald Reagan with great vehemence, mocking his “Great Communicator” moniker well beyond the duration of Reagan’s presidential term. Other recurrent subjects have included political figures such as Richard Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover and both Bush presidents, and historical events such as the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement. Following the events of September 11, 2001, Pettibon’s political explorations have gained in intensity, with numerous works on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the prisoner abuses at Abu Ghraib, President Obama and Osama bin Laden; he also made several drawings depicting flag-draped coffins (countering the government’s policy of banning from the press all images of soldier’s coffins). Accompanying this intensified political content has been a notable shift in style, with a closer, more vivid rendering of his subjects. Raymond Pettibon: Here’s Your Irony Back surveys these and other political themes throughout the artist’s work, from the mid-1970s to 2013.

  1. Here’s Your Irony Back
 

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