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Shop > Artists' Books

#11442

J'ai Froid

Price
$7.00
Date
2014
Publisher
Castillo/Corrales
Format
Artists' Books
Size
23 × 25.5 cm
Length
26 pages
Genre
, Essays, Conversations, , Contemporary Art
Description

Published on the aftermath of the exhibition “J’ai froid,” the fourth issue of castillo/corrales today comprises two essays and a dialogue, all dealing with oppositional strategies by cultural producers in Scandinavia. Through a reading of the work and practices of artists and black metal musicians, the publication reflects on the contentions of Scandinavian culture and the need to express angst and defiance, and to challenge the normative in society and art.

In the essay “Insider Art,” artist Sidsel Meineche Hansen reflects on the relation between the artist and the institution through the practice of artist and psychiatric patient, Ovartaci. “Three Notes of the Evolution of Nordic Transgression” is an essay by art historian Niels Henriksen that puts in relation different conceptions of the psyche and the myth, with Edvard Munch’s woodcut print technique, and Asger Jorn’s Scandinavian Institute for Comparative Vandalism. In a conversation titled, “Mediating Darkness,” curators Staffan Boije af Gennäs and Amelia Ishmael discuss the permeations of darkness in contemporary art and music, and the influence of black metal aesthetic.

Edition of 200.
Staple bound.
Black & white and color images.

  1. J’ai Froid
 

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